India Tour Package

Jodhpur City Guide

Rao Jodhaji, the chief of the Rathore clan of Rajputs moved his capital from its vulnerable position in Mandore to its present location in 1459. He first built the Mehrangarh Fort and then fortified the city surrounding it. In the early 16th century Rao Ganga Singh, one of his successors, joined hands with Rana Sangha, the great warrior king of Mewar against a common enemy, the Mughal Emperor Babur. During the reign of Babur's grandson Akbar, a tenuous peace was reached following his matrimonial and military alliances with many Rajput kingdoms. This period of calm allowed Jodhpur to become a centre for the arts and culture. By the end of the 18th century, aftera period of political strife, Jodhpur emerged as the largest and most powerful of princely states. By the time of Indian independence in 1947, it was a much-respected progressive kingdom Book Your Tourthat merged with the Indian Union.

Forts & Monuments Jodhpur

Guda Bishnoi

This village is inhabit ated by the Bishnoi community. They are staunch believers in the sanctity of plant and animal life. Villages are marked by Khejri trees and deers which thrive.

Jaswant Thada

Close to the fort complex, lies Jaswant Thada. This 19th century royal cenotaph built in white marble in commemoration of Maharaja Jaswant Singh II and three other cenotaphs, stand nearby. The cenotaph of Maharaja Jaswant Singh holds the rare portraits of the rulers and Maharajas of Jodhpur. A visit inside the cenotaphs, with some villagers of the region, would bring forward the reverence they still hold for their brave kings.

Mandore

Towards the north of Jodhpur is the ancient capital of Marwar, Mandore. It is just 8jodhpur Kms from the city. Main attractions of the place are hall of Heroes where sixteen huge figures which have been carved out of a single rock, the shrine of 330 million Gods and the royal cenotaphs. This area is of immense historical importance but what makes it worthy of a visit is the Hall of Heroes. Sixteen gigantic figures carved out of a single rock depicting popular Hindu and folk deities stand there in bright colours and are well maintained. But one can not miss the caves in crags and the sprawling gardens, which are now shelter place for monkeys and peacocks. Greenery of the place makes Mandore, in true sense, an oasis.

Mehrangarh Fort

Situated on a steep hill, Mehrangarh fort is one of the largest forts in India. The beauty and the grandeur of numerous palaces in the fort narrates a saga of hard sandstones yielding to the chisels of skilled Jodhpuri sculptures. Mehrangarh Fort, spreading over 5 km on a perpendicular hill and looking down 125 meters, presents a majestic view on city horizon.

It was built on advice of a saint in 1459 to establish an impregnable head-quarter. This Fort is one of the best in India with its exquisitely latticed windows, carved panels, elaborately adorned windows and walls of Moti Mahal, Phool Mahal, Sheesh Mahal. A collection of musical instruments, palanquins, royal costumes, furniture and the cannons on the fort's ramparts are well preserved.

Ossian

65 Kms from Jodhpur, lies ruins of an ancient city called Ossian. This city is famous for Brahmanical and Jain temples, which belong to 8th and 11th century. Surya or Sun temple and the Sachiya temples are famous for their beauty. The shikhar of Sachiya temple is clustered by two rows of turrets, an ambulatory and a large assembly hall with an elaborate ceiling. This town which was once a great trading centre is an oasis and houses an abundance of peacocks. Thumed-bhawane largest of the 16 Jain and Brahmanical temples is dedicated to Mahavira, the last of the Jain tirthankars. In the same area the Surya temple has fascinating images of Durga, Surya and Ganesh. The sculptural intricacy of the Osian temples rival that of any of the famous temples of the country, be it the Sun Temple of Konark, or the Hoysala temples of Karnataka.

Umaid Bhawan Palace

The romantic looking Umaid Bhawan Palace was actually built with the purpose of giving employment to the people of Jodhpur during a long drawn famine. The royal family of Jodhpur still lives in a part of the palace.Another part of the palace houses a well-maintained museum, displaying an amazing array of items belonging to the Maharaja and the r Book Your Touroyal family - weapons, antiques & fascinating clocks, crockery and trophies.