India Tour Package

Delhi City Guide

It is said to have been a kingdom of the Gods long before man discovered it. Nestling between the Aravalis on its south and northwest and the Yamuna on its east, it provided the perfect settlement even for early man. The legendary capital of the Pandavas called Indraprastha was here found within the parameters of the Purana Qila. This was in 1000 B.C.

The next few centuries saw a constant settlement in Delhi, one in which various kings vied for the rights to this incomparable city. akshardhamThe remains of these kingdoms and the ruins discovered in recent years make up the seven ancient cities of Delhi.

Udaipur to Delhi Tour PackagesTo see Delhi then is to look into the glimpses of its past and the fine monuments and buildings its invaders have left through the centuries. The walls of the Qutab Minar and its surrounding areas make up the first city. First ruled by The Tomar kings in 1060 then taken over by the Rajput Chauhans in the 12th century, this area was taken over by Qutb-ud-din Aibak who captured Delhi in 1193 AD.

At the end of the 13th century the Khilji dynasty built their new capital at Siri - the second city of Delhi. Here, along with the historical remnants of the Khiljis, are new and modern buildings - the Asian Games Village and the Siri Fort Auditorium which bear witness to a different kind of history: the Asian Games in 1982.

The third city of Delhi, Tughlakabad, was built inside a great fortress with 13 outer gates. This huge structure was built over a span of just five years during the reign of Ghiyas-ud-din from 1321-25. His tomb is across the road from the main entrance to the fort. The fort itself was later abandoned, possibly because of the shortage of water.

The fourth city of Delhi, Jahanpanah, was built by Muhammed Bin Tughlak. But soon after it was built, Tughlak decided to transfer his capital from Delhi to Daulatabad in Deccan. It was a long and difficult march of 1120 kilometers. Many of his soldiers died in this march and when Tughlak had to finally concede his error in judgment, Delhi resumed its status as capital. Few remains of the fifth city of Ferozabad can be found today. This was built by Feroz Shah Tughlak in 1351, on the banks of the river Yamuna, and later demolished by Shah Jahan to build Shahjahanabad.

Tomb and monuments of the Lodi and Sayyid dynasties lie within the Lodi gardens- the sixth city. Old Delhi is the seventh cities. The red fort was built by Shah Jahan who selected masons and craftsmen from all over the country for this task. Red sandstone was especially brought in from Agra. This fort was defended by 14 massive gates of which only five remain.

The Capital alternated between Agra and Delhi during these years and soon after the British established themselves it was removed to Calcutta. It was only in 1911 that Delhi resumed its position and the architects, Edward Lutyens and his colleague; Herbert Baker envisaged their plan for the city. They designed the Rashtrapati Bhawan and its surrounding areas in a style meant to be the best combination of Indian, Roman and English architecture.

Delhi City Guide - Places to see in Delhi

From there on began the new cities that embody Delhi. The buildings reaching for the sky, the numerous hotels and shopping centers. Connaught Place, built in 1931, set the motion for the development of New Delhi. Now, shopping centers have sprung up in virtually every colony. Delhi continues to spread out fast including the far-flung suburbs and even some former forest areas.It is said to have been a kingdom of the Gods long before man discovered it. Nestling between the Aravalis on its south and northwest and the Yamuna on its east, it provided the perfect settlement even for early man. The legendary capital of the Pandavas called Indraprastha was here found within the parameters of the Purana Qila. This was in 1000 B.C.

The next few centuries saw a constant settlement in Delhi, one in which various kings vied for the rights to this incomparable city. The remains of these kingdoms and the ruins discovered in recent years make up the seven ancient cities of Delhi.

To see Delhi then is to look into the glimpses of its past and the fine monuments and buildings its invaders have left through the centuries. The walls of the Qutab Minar and its surrounding areas make up the first city. First ruled by The Tomar kings in 1060 then taken over by the Rajput Chauhans in the 12th century, this area was taken over by Qutb-ud-din Aibak who captured Delhi in 1193 AD.

Udaipur to Delhi Tour PackagesAt the end of the 13th century the Khilji dynasty built their new capital at Siri - the second city of Delhi. Here, along with the historical remnants of the Khiljis, are new and modern buildings - the Asian Games Village and the Siri Fort Auditorium which bear witness to a different kind of history: the Asian Games in 1982.

The third city of Delhi, Tughlakabad, was built inside a great fortress with 13 outer gates. This huge structure was built over a span of just five years during the reign of Ghiyas-ud-din from 1321-25. His tomb is across the road from the main entrance to the fort. The fort itself was later abandoned, possibly because of the shortage of water.

The fourth city of Delhi, Jahanpanah, was built by Muhammed Bin Tughlak. But soon after it was built, Tughlak decided to transfer his capital from Delhi to Daulatabad in Deccan. It was a long and difficult march of 1120 kilometers. Many of his soldiers died in this march and when Tughlak had to finally concede his error in judgment, Delhi resumed its status as capital. Few remains of the fifth city of Ferozabad can be found today. This was built by Feroz Shah Tughlak in 1351, on the banks of the river Yamuna, and later demolished by Shah Jahan to build Shahjahanabad.

Tomb and monuments of the Lodi and Sayyid dynasties lie within the Lodi gardens- the sixth city. Old Delhi is the seventh cities. The red fort was built by Shah Jahan who selected masons and craftsmen from all over the country for this task. Red sandstone was especially brought in from Agra. This fort was defended by 14 massive gates of which only five remain.

The Capital alternated between Agra and Delhi during these years and soon after the British established themselves it was removed to Calcutta. It was only in 1911 that Delhi resumed its position and the architects, Edward Lutyens and his colleague; Herbert Baker envisaged their plan for the city. They designed the Rashtrapati Bhawan and its surrounding areas in a style meant to be the best combination of Indian, Roman and English architecture.

From there on began the new cities that embody Delhi. The buildings reaching for the sky, the numerous hotels and shopping centers. Connaught Place, built in 1931, set the motion for the development of Book Your Tour New Delhi. Now, shopping centers have sprung up in virtually every colony. Delhi continues to spread out fast including the far-flung suburbs and even some former forest areas.

Udaipur to Delhi Tour Packages

Forts & Monuments Delhi

India Gate

Udaipur to Delhi Tour PackagesAt the centre of New Delhi stands the 42 m high India Gate, an "Arc-de-Triomphe" like archway in the middle of a crossroad. Almost similar to its French counterpart, it commemorates the 70,000 Indian soldiers who lost their lives fighting for the British Army during the World War I. The memorial bears the names of more than 13,516 British and Indian soldiers killed in the Northwestern Frontier in the Afghan war of 1919.The foundation stone of India Gate was laid by His Royal Highness, the Duke of Connaught in 1921 and it was designed by Edwin Lutyens. The monument was dedicated to the nation 10 years later by the then Viceroy, Lord Irwin. Another memorial, Amar Jawan Jyoti was added much later, after India got its independence. The eternal flame burns day and night under the arch to remind the naindia-gatetion of soldiers who laid down their lives in the Indo-Pakistan War of December1971.The entire arch stands on a low base of red Bharatpur stone and rises in stages to a huge moulding. The cornice is inscribed with the Imperial suns while both sides of the arch have INDIA, flanked by the dates MCMXIV (1914 left) and MCMXIX (1919 right). The shallow domed bowl at the top was intended to be filled with burning oil on anniversaries but this is rarely done.During nightfall, India Gate is dramatically floodlit while the fountains nearby make a lovely display with coloured lights. India Gate stands at one end of Rajpath, and the area surrounding it is generally referred to as 'India Gate'.Surrounding the imposing structure is a large expanse of lush green lawns, which is a popular picnic spot. One can see hoards of people moving about the brightly lit area and on the lawns on summer evenings.

Jama Masjid

This great mosque of Old Delhi is the largest in India, with a courtyard capable of holding 25,000 devotees. It was begun in 1644 and ended up being the final architectural extravagance of Shah Jahan, the Mughal emperor who built the Taj Mahal and the Red Fort.

The highly decorative mosque has three great gates, four towers and two 40 m-high minarets constructed of strips of red sandstone and white marble. Travellers can hire robes at the northern gate. This may be the only time you get to dress like a local without feeling like an outsider , so make the most of it.

Lal Quila

The red sandstone walls of the massive Red Fort (Lal Qila) rise 33-m above the clamour of Old Delhi as a reminder of the magnificent power and pomp of the Mughal emperors. The walls, built in 1638, were designed to keep out invaders, now they mainly keep out the noise and confusion of the city.

The main gate, Lahore Gate, is one of the emotional and symbolic focal points of the modern Indian nation and attracts a major crowd each Independence Day.

The vaulted arcade of Chatta Chowk, a bazaar selling tourist trinkets, leads into the huge fort compound. Inside is a veritable treasure trove of buildings, including the Drum House, the Hall of Public Audiences, the white marble Hall of Private Audiences, the Pearl Mosque, Royal Baths and Palace of Color.

An evening sound and light show re-creates events in India's history connected with the fort.

Qutab Minar

Qutab Minar is a soaring, 73 m-high tower of victory, built in 1193 by Qutab-ud-din Aibak immediately after the defeat of Delhi's last Hindu kingdom. The tower has five distinct storeys, each marked by a projecting balcony and tapers from a 15 m diameter at the base to just 2.5 m at the top. The first three storeys are made of red sandstone; the fourth and fifth storeys are of marble and sandstone. At the foot of the tower is the Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque, the first mosque to be built in India. An inscription over its eastern gate provocatively informs that it was built with material obtained from demolishing '27 Hindu temples'. A 7 m-high iron pillar stands in the courtyard of the mosque. It is said that if you can encircle it with your hands while standing with your back to it your wish will be fulfilled.

The origins of Qutab Minar are shrouded in controversy. Some believe it was erected as a tower of victory to signify the beginning of the Muslim rule in India. Others say it served as a minaret to the muezzins to call the faithful to prayer.

No one can, however, dispute that the tower is not only one of the finest monuments in India, but also in the world. Qutab-ud-din Aibak, the first Muslim ruler of Delhi, commenced the construction of the Qutab Minar in 1200 AD, but could only finish the basement. His successor, Iltutmush, added three more storeys, and in 1368, Firoz Shah Tughlak constructed the fifth and thelaststorey.

Udaipur to Delhi Tour PackagesThe development of architectural styles from Aibak to Tughlak is quite evident in the minar. The relief work and even the materials used for construction differ. The 238 feet Qutab Minar is 47 feet at the base and tapers to nine feet at the apex. The tower is ornamented by bands of inscriptions and by four projecting balconies supported by elaborately decorated brackets. Even in ruin, the Quwwat Ui Islam (Light of Islam) Mosque in the Qutab complex is one of the most magnificent in the world. Qutab-ud-din Aibak started its construction in 1193 and the mosque wascompletedin1197.Iltutmush in 1230 and Alla-ud-din Khilji in 1315 made additions to the building. The main mosque comprises of an inner and outer courtyard, of which an exquisite colonnade, the pillars of which are made of richly, surrounds the inner decorated shafts. Most of these shafts are from the 27 Hindu temples, which were plundered to construct the mosque. It is, therefore, not surprising that the Muslim mosque has typical Hindu ornamentation. Close to the mosque is one of Delhi's most curious antiques, the Iron Pillar.

Humayun Tomb

Located near the crossing of Mahura road and Lodhi road, this magnificent garden tomb is the first substantial example of Mughal architecture in India. It was buit in 1565 A.D.nine years after the death of Humayun, by his senior widow Bega Begam. Inside the walled enclosure the most notable feature are the garden squares (chaharbagh) with pathways water channels, centrally located well proportional mausoleum topped by double dome. There are several graves of Mughal rulers located inside the walled enclosure and from here in 1857 A.D; Lieutenant Hudson had captured the last Mughal emperor Bahadur Shah II.

Udaipur to Delhi Tour Packages